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CONDITIONS

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  •     ADHD
  •     Anxiety Disorders
  •     ALS (Lou Gehrig's)
  •     Anorexia
  •     Arthritis
  •     Asthma
  •     Back Pain
  •     Cachexia (Wasting Syndrome)
  •     Cancer
  •     Crohn’s Disease
  •     Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

 

 

 

 

 

  •     Diabetes
  •     Epilepsy
  •     Glaucoma
  •     Hepatitis C
  •     HIV/AIDS
  •     Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  •     Lyme Disease
  •     Migraine
  •     Multiple Sclerosis
  •     Muscle Spasms (Myoclonus)

 

 

 

 

 

  •     Muscular Dystrophy
  •     Parkinson’s Disease
  •     Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

             (PTSD)

  •     Severe, Chronic Pain
  •     Severe Nausea
  •     Sickle Cell Anemia
  •     Spasticity
  •     Terminal Disease
  • Other Conditions with Similar Symptoms

 

 

 

Get Started

 

Medical Marijuana & ADHD

 

Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder, as well as the closely related Attention Deficit Disorder, is one of the most widespread mental health disorders, affecting nine percent of children and upwards of five percent of the adult population worldwide. While the exact cause of the condition is an ongoing area of research, the general consensus is that the symptoms stem from a lack of dopamine in the regions of the brain responsible for complex thoughts, decision-making, and conscious control of social behaviors. This is what leads to the inattention, restlessness, and lack of impulse control that patient’s experience. The promise of medical marijuana with ADHD/ADD, when prescribed by a healthcare professional and closely monitored, is that it works in a fundamentally different manner than the usually prescribed stimulants Ritalin and Adderall. While these two block the breakdown of the small amounts of dopamine that the brain does produce, medical marijuana actually increases the production of dopamine itself. This means that many patients enjoy the positive effect of enhanced concentration, without many of the unwanted side effects of amphetamine-based stimulants.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana & Anorexia

 

The “munchies” commonly attributed to marijuana actually has a biological basis, allowing medical marijuana to be an effective alternative treatment against eating disorders. These, and anorexia nervosa in particular, are incredibly disruptive in the lives of those afflicted. In fact, anorexia is the most common eating disorder and has the highest mortality and suicide rate of any psychiatric condition; this is amplified by the fact that, according to the National Eating Disorders Association, thirty million Americans will develop an eating disorder in their lifetimes. It is well documented that the body’s own set of cannabis-like chemicals, which are produced regardless of the intake of any marijuana, are key in regulating appetite. The effect of these ‘endocannabinoids’ are mimicked by medical marijuana, and when given to patients afflicted with significant weight loss due to HIV/AIDS and cancer, it creates sustained weight gain and a return of appetite. Since the first studies, these results have been repeated many times, with similar results and a well-noted lack of major side effects. This is widely expected to carry over to the use of medical marijuana in patients with anorexia.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana & Anxiety

 

The chemical compounds in medical marijuana are well known for stabilizing mood, and especially for reducing anxiety. The same is true when the anxiety is severe enough to become a diagnosable disorder, offering the hope of a restored day-to-day life and social interactions to patients living with anxiety disorders. Regardless of the presentation of the anxiety, whether it is Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and others, the cause in the brain is the same. The fight-or-flight response is triggered in the amygdala, which is a part of the brain responsible for connecting what we see to what we fear, in the wrong situations. Neurotransmitters that play a role in this are regulated by cannabinoids produced in the body and found in medical marijuana. A 2008 study used MRI to directly see how THC (which leads to feeling “high” with recreational marijuana) reduces the fear response in patients exposed to frightening images, and a more recent study published in Psychopharmacology showed that CBD (also found in marijuana) reverses the physical response to fear in forty-eight test subjects. A trained physician can help a patient find the correct mix of CBD and THC that will significantly reduce one’s anxiety with little to no side effects.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana & Arthritis

 

The general analgesic (pain reducing) effect of medical cannabis is broadly known and described elsewhere, and that alone is a strong reason for patients with arthritis to consider medical marijuana when other pain-relieving medications have been unsuccessful. But, new research is beginning to show how and why medical marijuana can benefit patients in another way, by directly addressing the inflammation in the joints that leads to so much pain. Researchers have identified two receptors that interact with the cannabinoids in medical cannabis, one of which, called CB2, is found outside of the central nervous system. Another study shows that this receptor is found in the tissue of joints themselves, and that activation of CB2 has an anti-inflammatory effect. Still more research suggests that medical marijuana limits the damage of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in humans, and direct application of CBD offers a potent anti-arthritic effect in mice, even when taken orally.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana & Asthma

 

Intuitively, asthmatic patients should carefully consider what they inhale, whether it be the pollen of the outdoors or cigarette smoke, and weight how likely it is to trigger an asthma attack. However, the role that the body’s endocannabinoid system plays in modulating muscular contractions in the airway means that medical marijuana, even when inhaled, defies this logic. CB1 receptors, the type that are found in the brain, also regulate the signaling of nerves in the lungs, and control the action of muscles that dilate and constrict the airways themselves. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that a single dose of inhaled marijuana reduces airway resistance, or the effort needed to push air into the smallest vessels in the lungs. A long-term study in the Journal for the American Medical Association similarly finds that low levels of even recreational marijuana use increases lung function, and the highest levels of use still saw no negative effect on lung capacity. This suggests that low-dose use of refined medical marijuana could modulate the symptoms of asthma, without the side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids.

 

 

Medical Marijuana & Cancer

 

There are few diagnoses as frightening as cancer, and the treatments currently available have significant side effects that often require a cocktail of additional medications to control. However, thousands have used medical marijuana to reduce and even eliminate the major side effects of chemotherapy and radiation treatments, preserving quality of life for the patient and their family. According to both the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute, cannabinoids found in medical marijuana have powerful antiemetic effects (anti-vomiting) even when other medications have failed. This complements the positive effect on appetite, and for decades this has been recognized as very beneficial for patients who would otherwise be nutrient deficient. With respect to pain management, medical marijuana reduces both pain perception and the dosage requirements of opioids, regardless of if the pain was caused by nerve damage, inflammation, or other tissue damage. Lastly, placebo-controlled studies show that patients using medical marijuana report improved sleep quality, less acute anxiety, and a better mood overall throughout their treatment process.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Chronic Abdominal Pain

(irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease)

 

The chronic abdominal pain found in Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Crohn’s Disease, and Ulcerative Colitis stems from the body’s immune system incorrectly recognizing parts of the digestive system as foreign, and attacking the tissue as if it were an infection. The apparent reduction in most of the symptoms of these diseases when the appropriate medical marijuana is used is an intense area of research. CB1 and CB2 receptors are found in different places throughout the digestive system, but the well-known anti-inflammatory role of the CB2 receptor is believed to play the major role in medical marijuana’s effectiveness here. A recent observational study strongly suggests that cannabis use reduced the intensity of symptoms, the dosages of additional medications, and the need for corrective surgery in the vast majority of subjects. Another study even shows nearly half of patients entering remission, and the rest improving their quality of life with no significant side effects.

 

Medical Marijuana &

Chronic Back Pain

 

Chronic back pain affects millions of Americans, and the statistics show that our aging and increasingly sedentary population will lead to more Americans suffering from this condition in the near future. Whether it be due to poor posture, some past trauma, or a degenerative disease affecting the spine, the main concerns of patients lie in the pain itself, and worries over the side effects of opioid pain killers. The general pain-relief benefits of medical marijuana are anecdotally known, supported by many studies, and are discussed elsewhere on this page. Specific to the relief of back pain, a study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found that medical marijuana offers significant pain reduction to patients afflicted with neuropathic pain, a common source of back pain; additionally, even when the cannabis was not the sole medication being taken for pain relief, its use reduced the dosage and frequency of the prescribed opioid. This isn’t all: animal studies clearly show that the CBD in cannabis directly protects the soft disks of the spine from further damage.

 

Medical Marijuana &

Chronic Pain

 

Chronic physical pain, no matter where it is found in the body, will have two causes. Either it is neuropathic (due to damage to the nerves responsible for relaying sensory information to the brain) or nociceptive (due to tissue damage detected by pain-sensing nociceptors, the “usual” pain experienced by most people); for both of these, there is mounting evidence that medical marijuana reduces or eliminates the pain. A 2015 publication by the American Medical Association reiterates that the use of medical marijuana for chronic physical and neuropathic pain is supported by high-quality evidence. Researchers believe that the benefits have two causes. First, binding to the CB1 receptors on the body’s nerve cells moderates release of several neurotransmitters, and lowers the intensity of the pain signal that reaches the brain. Second, binding to the CB2 receptors on cells involved in the immune system reduces the amount of pro-inflammatory chemicals they secrete – this inflammation is the sources of many patient’s chronic pain. The differences from patient to patient mean that the best use of prescription cannabis is made under the supervision of a qualified physician.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Depression

 

Clinically diagnosed depression goes well beyond the occasional mood swing experienced by everyone; the lack of appetite, lack of interest in daily activities, feelings of worthlessness, poor sleep quality, and other symptoms massively reduce the patient’s quality of life. Anecdotal evidence has shown for hundreds of years that cannabis can be used to combat the symptoms of depressive disorders. More recent studies show a mixture of results, but almost of all of these examined recreational marijuana use with respect to depression. In a University of Colorado study, researchers found that under more controlled conditions and with consideration of personality factors, marijuana use negatively predicted depressions symptoms. Additional research has led the scientific community to believe that depression is caused by de-regulation of serotonin in the brain, an important neurotransmitter. All of the serotonin regulators typically prescribed for depression have major side effects and a significant risk of withdrawal symptoms – a risk almost never found with prescription cannabis. Medical marijuana similarly regulates the production of serotonin, and research suggests that it works best at low dosages. The possibility of reducing the symptoms of depression with doses too low to have induce the euphoric sensation of being “high” makes medical marijuana a strong candidate to treat this disorder.

 

Medical Marijuana &

Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders

 

Seizure disorders of all kinds come from the misfiring of neurons in the brain, and can manifest in numerous ways, from periodic blackouts all the way up to full body convulsions. Epilepsy, the most common of the seizure disorders, has long been thought of as a condition potentially treatable by medical cannabis. This is because the endocannabinoid system is chiefly responsible for feedback regulation at the point where one neuron communicates with another, making it a critical part of normal signal transmission in the brain. Growing evidence suggests that the major non-psychoactive component of medical marijuana, CBD, promotes the activity of the endocannabinoid system, which in turn reduces the excitability of neurons in the brain. Among patients with seizure disorders that were not responsive to currently available treatments, pure CBD reduced seizure activity to a much greater extent than those taking a placebo.

 

Medical Marijuana &

 Glaucoma

 

Glaucoma, one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness, affects upwards of three million Americans. It is characterized by degeneration of the optic nerve that conducts visual information from the eye to the brain, and is now understood to be a neurodegenerative condition similar to Alzheimer’s disease. A key factor in the progression of the disease is the pressure of the fluid within the eyeball itself, or intraocular pressure (IOP); a proven way to prevent further blindness is to find a way to reduce the IOP. Since the 1970s, research conclusively showed that medical marijuana reduced the pressure within the eye, most likely through the action of cannabinoid receptors along the tissue lining the interior of the eye. When taken orally or applied topically, CBD and other components of medical marijuana show promise as additional treatment options for glaucoma, especially in the disease’s later stages.

Medical Marijuana &
Insomnia

 

A large fraction of the adult population has insomnia in some form, and one in ten have chronic insomnia. It is broadly understood that recreational marijuana induces feelings of relaxation and assists with falling asleep, and it promised to be another way to treat insomnia. A 2008 study shows that moderate doses of THC facilitates falling asleep, increases the amount of Stage 4 “deep sleep” one experiences, and has little to no residual effects after one wakes up the next morning. Another variable is the way in which one takes the medical marijuana, which in turn effects how long its effects are felt. Inhaling its components has an effect for three to four hours, while ingestion lasts about twice as long. A qualified physician can help the patient identify the medicine that works best when others have failed, whether it be to help one fall asleep (inhalation of medical marijuana) or to stay asleep (ingestion of medical cannabis at bed time).

 

Medical Marijuana &

Migraines

 

A growing body of research is clearly showing that medical marijuana is a potent treatment for migraines, cluster headaches, and similar conditions. While the underlying causes of these types of headaches is an area of active investigation, there is some consensus that the pain-modulating role of the endocannabinoid system plays a part in medical marijuana’s effect. Additionally, studies of animal models suggest that CB2 receptors outside of the central nervous system play a specific role in the perception of pain. A study in Pharmacotherapy clearly shows that there is a significant reduction in the frequency and severity of headaches, inhaled medical cannabis can abort an ongoing headache in many people, and far fewer side effects are observed by inhaled prescription cannabis compared to edible cannabis products. Still another study shows that THC and CBD together can be more effective in treating migraine headaches, than even currently available treatments.

Medical Marijuana &

Nausea

Medical cannabis is a trusted alternative medication for fighting nausea and vomiting. Growing evidence draws this out, and that this is because the endocannabinoid system regulates the feeling of nausea in humans. The National Cancer Institute lists medical marijuana as an effective and well-tolerated medication for those undergoing chemotherapy, when it comes to eliminating the sensation of nausea and the vomiting that goes with it. A 2008 review published in the European Journal of Cancer Care analyzed 30 clinical studies using cannabinoid drugs synthesized in the lab (such as Marinol) and concluded that they were better than standard anti-nausea drugs in alleviating the nausea and vomiting that accompanies chemotherapy. The same is also true when all other anti-nausea medications have been tried unsuccessfully. This extends over to nausea from any underlying cause, so that those suffering from chronic nausea can and have used medical marijuana with very positive results on their quality of life.

Medical Marijuana &

Neuropathic Pain

 

Neuropathic pain often feels like a tingling, burning, stabbing pain. Neuropathic pain can be difficult to diagnose and tricky to treat. It’s most often a symptom of an underlying problem like diabetes, alcoholism or autoimmune disease. Neuropathy can also be caused by vitamin-B deficiency, tumors, infections, cancer treatments and certain hereditary disorders. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, reported in The Journal of Pain that patients with neuropathy who used marijuana were more likely to have significant relief than those taking a placebo. The cannabinoids in marijuana affect cell receptors in the brain, reducing pain and making it an alternative for patients who are unresponsive to standard drug therapies. Patients often turn to marijuana as a pain reliever that doesn’t possess the harmful side effects of other prescription neuropathy medications which can be addictive.

 

Medical Marijuana &

Persistent Muscle Spasms

 

Muscle spasms can develop in any of the muscles of the body, and have causes that range from local electrolyte imbalances and dehydration, to the nerve damage of debilitating diseases. Cannabinoid receptors outside of the central nervous system provide feedback between nerve cells, and manipulating this process allows medical marijuana to massively reduce the amount of severity of spasms. One of the best-documented uses for prescription cannabis has been to treat the spasms and other uncontrolled movements of Multiple Sclerosis, and more recent investigations suggest that medical marijuana is equally effective for patients with spinal cord injuries. Other medications used to reduce muscle spasticity, like barbiturates and similar medicines, have major side effects that many patients find intolerable. Medical marijuana lacks any of these, and the ratio of THC to CBD can be adjusted to reduce the side effects that are present.

 

Medical Marijuana &

PTSD

 

Medical marijuana offers the hope of relief and a return to normalcy for thousands of people with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD is a mal-adaptation of one’s fight-or-flight response, so that anxiety, hyper-vigilance, nightmares, and other symptoms can intrude upon one’s everyday life at anytime. The body’s own set of cannabis-like chemicals, which are produced regardless of the intake of any marijuana, are pivotal in regulating one’s emotional responses. An analysis of the levels of these chemicals in the endocannabinoid systems of PTSD sufferers reveals consistently lower levels of anandamide and other cannabinoids. Correcting this imbalance with medical marijuana holds tremendous promise for patients. Studies published in Molecular Psychiatry, Science Daily, and other journals depict how PTSD sufferers using prescription cannabis report fewer nightmares, less reliving of the initial traumatic event, and above all, a reduction in hyper-arousal. This means less avoidance of situations that reminds the patient of the triggering event, less aggression, and a fuller enjoyment of social interactions.

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Call today: 305-433-1767

 

 

  •     Anxiety
  •     ALS (Lou Gehrig's)
  •     Anorexia
  •     Arthritis
  •     Back Pain
  •     Cachexia (Wasting Syndrome)
  •     Cancer
  •     Chron's Disease
  •     Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome
  •     Diabetes

 

 

 

 

 

  •     Epilepsy
  •     Glaucoma
  •     Hepatitis C
  •     HIV
  •     Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  •     Lyme Disease
  •     Migraines
  •     Multiple Sclerosis
  •     Muscle Spasms
  •     Muscular Dystrophy

 

 

 

 

 

  •     Parkinson's Disease
  •     Post Traumatic Stress (PTSD)
  •     Seizures
  •     Severe & Chronic Pain
  •     Severe Nausea
  •     Sickle Cell Anemia
  •     Spasticity
  •     Any Terminal Condition
  •    Other Debilitating Condition of Like Kind, Or Class

 

 

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

ADHD

 

Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder, as well as the closely related Attention Deficit Disorder, is one of the most widespread mental health disorders, affecting nine percent of children and upwards of five percent of the adult population worldwide. While the exact cause of the condition is an ongoing area of research, the general consensus is that the symptoms stem from a lack of dopamine in the regions of the brain responsible for complex thoughts, decision-making, and conscious control of social behaviors. This is what leads to the inattention, restlessness, and lack of impulse control that patient’s experience. The promise of medical marijuana with ADHD/ADD, when prescribed by a healthcare professional and closely monitored, is that it works in a fundamentally different manner than the usually prescribed stimulants Ritalin and Adderall. While these two block the breakdown of the small amounts of dopamine that the brain does produce, medical marijuana actually increases the production of dopamine itself. This means that many patients enjoy the positive effect of enhanced concentration, without many of the unwanted side effects of amphetamine-based stimulants.

 

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

ANOREXIA

 

The “munchies” commonly attributed to marijuana actually has a biological basis, allowing medical marijuana to be an effective alternative treatment against eating disorders. These, and anorexia nervosa in particular, are incredibly disruptive in the lives of those afflicted. In fact, anorexia is the most common eating disorder and has the highest mortality and suicide rate of any psychiatric condition; this is amplified by the fact that, according to the National Eating Disorders Association, thirty million Americans will develop an eating disorder in their lifetimes. It is well documented that the body’s own set of cannabis-like chemicals, which are produced regardless of the intake of any marijuana, are key in regulating appetite. The effect of these ‘endocannabinoids’ are mimicked by medical marijuana, and when given to patients afflicted with significant weight loss due to HIV/AIDS and cancer, it creates sustained weight gain and a return of appetite. Since the first studies, these results have been repeated many times, with similar results and a well-noted lack of major side effects. This is widely expected to carry over to the use of medical marijuana in patients with anorexia.

 

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Anxiety

 

The chemical compounds in medical marijuana are well known for stabilizing mood, and especially for reducing anxiety. The same is true when the anxiety is severe enough to become a diagnosable disorder, offering the hope of a restored day-to-day life and social interactions to patients living with anxiety disorders. Regardless of the presentation of the anxiety, whether it is Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and others, the cause in the brain is the same. The fight-or-flight response is triggered in the amygdala, which is a part of the brain responsible for connecting what we see to what we fear, in the wrong situations. Neurotransmitters that play a role in this are regulated by cannabinoids produced in the body and found in medical marijuana. A 2008 study used MRI to directly see how THC (which leads to feeling “high” with recreational marijuana) reduces the fear response in patients exposed to frightening images, and a more recent study published in Psychopharmacology showed that CBD (also found in marijuana) reverses the physical response to fear in forty-eight test subjects. A trained physician can help a patient find the correct mix of CBD and THC that will significantly reduce one’s anxiety with little to no side effects.

 

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Arthritis

 

The general analgesic (pain reducing) effect of medical cannabis is broadly known and described elsewhere, and that alone is a strong reason for patients with arthritis to consider medical marijuana when other pain-relieving medications have been unsuccessful. But, new research is beginning to show how and why medical marijuana can benefit patients in another way, by directly addressing the inflammation in the joints that leads to so much pain. Researchers have identified two receptors that interact with the cannabinoids in medical cannabis, one of which, called CB2, is found outside of the central nervous system. Another study shows that this receptor is found in the tissue of joints themselves, and that activation of CB2 has an anti-inflammatory effect. Still more research suggests that medical marijuana limits the damage of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in humans, and direct application of CBD offers a potent anti-arthritic effect in mice, even when taken orally.

 

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Asthma

 

Intuitively, asthmatic patients should carefully consider what they inhale, whether it be the pollen of the outdoors or cigarette smoke, and weight how likely it is to trigger an asthma attack. However, the role that the body’s endocannabinoid system plays in modulating muscular contractions in the airway means that medical marijuana, even when inhaled, defies this logic. CB1 receptors, the type that are found in the brain, also regulate the signaling of nerves in the lungs, and control the action of muscles that dilate and constrict the airways themselves. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that a single dose of inhaled marijuana reduces airway resistance, or the effort needed to push air into the smallest vessels in the lungs. A long-term study in the Journal for the American Medical Association similarly finds that low levels of even recreational marijuana use increases lung function, and the highest levels of use still saw no negative effect on lung capacity. This suggests that low-dose use of refined medical marijuana could modulate the symptoms of asthma, without the side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Cancer

 

There are few diagnoses as frightening as cancer, and the treatments currently available have significant side effects that often require a cocktail of additional medications to control. However, thousands have used medical marijuana to reduce and even eliminate the major side effects of chemotherapy and radiation treatments, preserving quality of life for the patient and their family. According to both the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute, cannabinoids found in medical marijuana have powerful antiemetic effects (anti-vomiting) even when other medications have failed. This complements the positive effect on appetite, and for decades this has been recognized as very beneficial for patients who would otherwise be nutrient deficient. With respect to pain management, medical marijuana reduces both pain perception and the dosage requirements of opioids, regardless of if the pain was caused by nerve damage, inflammation, or other tissue damage. Lastly, placebo-controlled studies show that patients using medical marijuana report improved sleep quality, less acute anxiety, and a better mood overall throughout their treatment process.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Chronic Abdominal Pain

(irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease)

 

The chronic abdominal pain found in Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Crohn’s Disease, and Ulcerative Colitis stems from the body’s immune system incorrectly recognizing parts of the digestive system as foreign, and attacking the tissue as if it were an infection. The apparent reduction in most of the symptoms of these diseases when the appropriate medical marijuana is used is an intense area of research. CB1 and CB2 receptors are found in different places throughout the digestive system, but the well-known anti-inflammatory role of the CB2 receptor is believed to play the major role in medical marijuana’s effectiveness here. A recent observational study strongly suggests that cannabis use reduced the intensity of symptoms, the dosages of additional medications, and the need for corrective surgery in the vast majority of subjects. Another study even shows nearly half of patients entering remission, and the rest improving their quality of life with no significant side effects.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Chronic Back Pain

 

Chronic back pain affects millions of Americans, and the statistics show that our aging and increasingly sedentary population will lead to more Americans suffering from this condition in the near future. Whether it be due to poor posture, some past trauma, or a degenerative disease affecting the spine, the main concerns of patients lie in the pain itself, and worries over the side effects of opioid pain killers. The general pain-relief benefits of medical marijuana are anecdotally known, supported by many studies, and are discussed elsewhere on this page. Specific to the relief of back pain, a study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found that medical marijuana offers significant pain reduction to patients afflicted with neuropathic pain, a common source of back pain; additionally, even when the cannabis was not the sole medication being taken for pain relief, its use reduced the dosage and frequency of the prescribed opioid. This isn’t all: animal studies clearly show that the CBD in cannabis directly protects the soft disks of the spine from further damage.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Chronic Pain

 

Chronic physical pain, no matter where it is found in the body, will have two causes. Either it is neuropathic (due to damage to the nerves responsible for relaying sensory information to the brain) or nociceptive (due to tissue damage detected by pain-sensing nociceptors, the “usual” pain experienced by most people); for both of these, there is mounting evidence that medical marijuana reduces or eliminates the pain. A 2015 publication by the American Medical Association reiterates that the use of medical marijuana for chronic physical and neuropathic pain is supported by high-quality evidence. Researchers believe that the benefits have two causes. First, binding to the CB1 receptors on the body’s nerve cells moderates release of several neurotransmitters, and lowers the intensity of the pain signal that reaches the brain. Second, binding to the CB2 receptors on cells involved in the immune system reduces the amount of pro-inflammatory chemicals they secrete – this inflammation is the sources of many patient’s chronic pain. The differences from patient to patient mean that the best use of prescription cannabis is made under the supervision of a qualified physician.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Depression

 

Clinically diagnosed depression goes well beyond the occasional mood swing experienced by everyone; the lack of appetite, lack of interest in daily activities, feelings of worthlessness, poor sleep quality, and other symptoms massively reduce the patient’s quality of life. Anecdotal evidence has shown for hundreds of years that cannabis can be used to combat the symptoms of depressive disorders. More recent studies show a mixture of results, but almost of all of these examined recreational marijuana use with respect to depression. In a University of Colorado study, researchers found that under more controlled conditions and with consideration of personality factors, marijuana use negatively predicted depressions symptoms. Additional research has led the scientific community to believe that depression is caused by de-regulation of serotonin in the brain, an important neurotransmitter. All of the serotonin regulators typically prescribed for depression have major side effects and a significant risk of withdrawal symptoms – a risk almost never found with prescription cannabis. Medical marijuana similarly regulates the production of serotonin, and research suggests that it works best at low dosages. The possibility of reducing the symptoms of depression with doses too low to have induce the euphoric sensation of being “high” makes medical marijuana a strong candidate to treat this disorder.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders

 

Seizure disorders of all kinds come from the misfiring of neurons in the brain, and can manifest in numerous ways, from periodic blackouts all the way up to full body convulsions. Epilepsy, the most common of the seizure disorders, has long been thought of as a condition potentially treatable by medical cannabis. This is because the endocannabinoid system is chiefly responsible for feedback regulation at the point where one neuron communicates with another, making it a critical part of normal signal transmission in the brain. Growing evidence suggests that the major non-psychoactive component of medical marijuana, CBD, promotes the activity of the endocannabinoid system, which in turn reduces the excitability of neurons in the brain. Among patients with seizure disorders that were not responsive to currently available treatments, pure CBD reduced seizure activity to a much greater extent than those taking a placebo.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Glaucoma

(end stages)

 

Glaucoma, one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness, affects upwards of three million Americans. It is characterized by degeneration of the optic nerve that conducts visual information from the eye to the brain, and is now understood to be a neurodegenerative condition similar to Alzheimer’s disease. A key factor in the progression of the disease is the pressure of the fluid within the eyeball itself, or intraocular pressure (IOP); a proven way to prevent further blindness is to find a way to reduce the IOP. Since the 1970s, research conclusively showed that medical marijuana reduced the pressure within the eye, most likely through the action of cannabinoid receptors along the tissue lining the interior of the eye. When taken orally or applied topically, CBD and other components of medical marijuana show promise as additional treatment options for glaucoma, especially in the disease’s later stages.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Insomnia

 

A large fraction of the adult population has insomnia in some form, and one in ten have chronic insomnia. It is broadly understood that recreational marijuana induces feelings of relaxation and assists with falling asleep, and it promised to be another way to treat insomnia. A 2008 study shows that moderate doses of THC facilitates falling asleep, increases the amount of Stage 4 “deep sleep” one experiences, and has little to no residual effects after one wakes up the next morning. Another variable is the way in which one takes the medical marijuana, which in turn effects how long its effects are felt. Inhaling its components has an effect for three to four hours, while ingestion lasts about twice as long. A qualified physician can help the patient identify the medicine that works best when others have failed, whether it be to help one fall asleep (inhalation of medical marijuana) or to stay asleep (ingestion of medical cannabis at bed time).

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Migraines

 

A growing body of research is clearly showing that medical marijuana is a potent treatment for migraines, cluster headaches, and similar conditions. While the underlying causes of these types of headaches is an area of active investigation, there is some consensus that the pain-modulating role of the endocannabinoid system plays a part in medical marijuana’s effect. Additionally, studies of animal models suggest that CB2 receptors outside of the central nervous system play a specific role in the perception of pain. A study in Pharmacotherapy clearly shows that there is a significant reduction in the frequency and severity of headaches, inhaled medical cannabis can abort an ongoing headache in many people, and far fewer side effects are observed by inhaled prescription cannabis compared to edible cannabis products. Still another study shows that THC and CBD together can be more effective in treating migraine headaches, than even currently available treatments.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Nausea

 

Medical cannabis is a trusted alternative medication for fighting nausea and vomiting. Growing evidence draws this out, and that this is because the endocannabinoid system regulates the feeling of nausea in humans. The National Cancer Institute lists medical marijuana as an effective and well-tolerated medication for those undergoing chemotherapy, when it comes to eliminating the sensation of nausea and the vomiting that goes with it. A 2008 review published in the European Journal of Cancer Care analyzed 30 clinical studies using cannabinoid drugs synthesized in the lab (such as Marinol) and concluded that they were better than standard anti-nausea drugs in alleviating the nausea and vomiting that accompanies chemotherapy. The same is also true when all other anti-nausea medications have been tried unsuccessfully. This extends over to nausea from any underlying cause, so that those suffering from chronic nausea can and have used medical marijuana with very positive results on their quality of life.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Neuropathic Pain

 

Neuropathic pain often feels like a tingling, burning, stabbing pain. Neuropathic pain can be difficult to diagnose and tricky to treat. It’s most often a symptom of an underlying problem like diabetes, alcoholism or autoimmune disease. Neuropathy can also be caused by vitamin-B deficiency, tumors, infections, cancer treatments and certain hereditary disorders. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, reported in The Journal of Pain that patients with neuropathy who used marijuana were more likely to have significant relief than those taking a placebo. The cannabinoids in marijuana affect cell receptors in the brain, reducing pain and making it an alternative for patients who are unresponsive to standard drug therapies. Patients often turn to marijuana as a pain reliever that doesn’t possess the harmful side effects of other prescription neuropathy medications which can be addictive.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Persistent Muscle Spasms

 

Muscle spasms can develop in any of the muscles of the body, and have causes that range from local electrolyte imbalances and dehydration, to the nerve damage of debilitating diseases. Cannabinoid receptors outside of the central nervous system provide feedback between nerve cells, and manipulating this process allows medical marijuana to massively reduce the amount of severity of spasms. One of the best-documented uses for prescription cannabis has been to treat the spasms and other uncontrolled movements of Multiple Sclerosis, and more recent investigations suggest that medical marijuana is equally effective for patients with spinal cord injuries. Other medications used to reduce muscle spasticity, like barbiturates and similar medicines, have major side effects that many patients find intolerable. Medical marijuana lacks any of these, and the ratio of THC to CBD can be adjusted to reduce the side effects that are present.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

PTSD

 

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a terrifying event in which grave physical or emotional harm occurred or was threatened. Traumatic events that may trigger PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat. Individuals with PTSD may have persistent frightening thoughts and memories, experience sleep problems, feel detached or numb, or be easily distracted. Researchers found that people with PTSD had lower levels of anandamide, an endogenous (naturally occurring) cannabinoid compound, compared to those who did not show signs of PTSD. Endogenous anandamide triggers the same receptors that are activated by THC and other components of the marijuana, therefore providing an effective and safe treatment for PTSD.

 

 

  •     Anxiety
  •     ALS (Lou Gehrig's)
  •     Anorexia
  •     Arthritis
  •     Back Pain
  •     Cachexia (Wasting Syndrome)
  •     Cancer
  •     Chron's Disease
  •     Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome
  •     Diabetes

 

 

 

 

 

  •     Epilepsy
  •     Glaucoma
  •     Hepatitis C
  •     HIV
  •     Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  •     Lyme Disease
  •     Migraines
  •     Multiple Sclerosis
  •     Muscle Spasms
  •     Muscular Dystrophy

 

 

 

 

 

  •     Parkinson's Disease
  •     Post Traumatic Stress (PTSD)
  •     Seizures
  •     Severe & Chronic Pain
  •     Severe Nausea
  •     Sickle Cell Anemia
  •     Spasticity
  •     Any Terminal Condition
  •    Other Debilitating Condition of Like Kind, Or Class

 

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

ADHD

 

Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder, as well as the closely related Attention Deficit Disorder, is one of the most widespread mental health disorders, affecting nine percent of children and upwards of five percent of the adult population worldwide. While the exact cause of the condition is an ongoing area of research, the general consensus is that the symptoms stem from a lack of dopamine in the regions of the brain responsible for complex thoughts, decision-making, and conscious control of social behaviors. This is what leads to the inattention, restlessness, and lack of impulse control that patient’s experience. The promise of medical marijuana with ADHD/ADD, when prescribed by a healthcare professional and closely monitored, is that it works in a fundamentally different manner than the usually prescribed stimulants Ritalin and Adderall. While these two block the breakdown of the small amounts of dopamine that the brain does produce, medical marijuana actually increases the production of dopamine itself. This means that many patients enjoy the positive effect of enhanced concentration, without many of the unwanted side effects of amphetamine-based stimulants.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Anorexia

 

The “munchies” commonly attributed to marijuana actually has a biological basis, allowing medical marijuana to be an effective alternative treatment against eating disorders. These, and anorexia nervosa in particular, are incredibly disruptive in the lives of those afflicted. In fact, anorexia is the most common eating disorder and has the highest mortality and suicide rate of any psychiatric condition; this is amplified by the fact that, according to the National Eating Disorders Association, thirty million Americans will develop an eating disorder in their lifetimes. It is well documented that the body’s own set of cannabis-like chemicals, which are produced regardless of the intake of any marijuana, are key in regulating appetite. The effect of these ‘endocannabinoids’ are mimicked by medical marijuana, and when given to patients afflicted with significant weight loss due to HIV/AIDS and cancer, it creates sustained weight gain and a return of appetite. Since the first studies, these results have been repeated many times, with similar results and a well-noted lack of major side effects. This is widely expected to carry over to the use of medical marijuana in patients with anorexia.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Anxiety

 

Scientists now understand that a cannabinoid molecule known as cannabidiol, or CBD, is responsible for many of the anxiety-relieving effects of marijuana. CBD, like the more well-known cannabinoid THC, is one of over 100 such molecules found in the marijuana plant. CBD has been shown to act on natural receptors that are found in our nervous system known as CB1 receptors. Marijuana can reduce anxiety because of its effect on the cannabinoid receptors compensating for the reduction in the production of natural endocannabinoids, specifically in the amygdala which is the part of the brain that is involved in regulating anxiety and the fight-or-flight response. A study led by Dr Sachin Patel and published in The Journal Neuron, showed for the first time how nerve cells in this part of the brain make and release their own natural ‘endocannabinoids’. The natural endocannabinoid system regulates anxiety and the response to stress by dampening signals in the brain.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Arthritis

 

The general analgesic (pain reducing) effect of medical cannabis is broadly known and described elsewhere, and that alone is a strong reason for patients with arthritis to consider medical marijuana when other pain-relieving medications have been unsuccessful. But, new research is beginning to show how and why medical marijuana can benefit patients in another way, by directly addressing the inflammation in the joints that leads to so much pain. Researchers have identified two receptors that interact with the cannabinoids in medical cannabis, one of which, called CB2, is found outside of the central nervous system. Another study shows that this receptor is found in the tissue of joints themselves, and that activation of CB2 has an anti-inflammatory effect. Still more research suggests that medical marijuana limits the damage of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in humans, and direct application of CBD offers a potent anti-arthritic effect in mice, even when taken orally.

 

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Asthma

 

Intuitively, asthmatic patients should carefully consider what they inhale, whether it be the pollen of the outdoors or cigarette smoke, and weight how likely it is to trigger an asthma attack. However, the role that the body’s endocannabinoid system plays in modulating muscular contractions in the airway means that medical marijuana, even when inhaled, defies this logic. CB1 receptors, the type that are found in the brain, also regulate the signaling of nerves in the lungs, and control the action of muscles that dilate and constrict the airways themselves. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that a single dose of inhaled marijuana reduces airway resistance, or the effort needed to push air into the smallest vessels in the lungs. A long-term study in the Journal for the American Medical Association similarly finds that low levels of even recreational marijuana use increases lung function, and the highest levels of use still saw no negative effect on lung capacity. This suggests that low-dose use of refined medical marijuana could modulate the symptoms of asthma, without the side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids.

 

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Cancer

 

There are few diagnoses as frightening as cancer, and the treatments currently available have significant side effects that often require a cocktail of additional medications to control. However, thousands have used medical marijuana to reduce and even eliminate the major side effects of chemotherapy and radiation treatments, preserving quality of life for the patient and their family. According to both the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute, cannabinoids found in medical marijuana have powerful antiemetic effects (anti-vomiting) even when other medications have failed. This complements the positive effect on appetite, and for decades this has been recognized as very beneficial for patients who would otherwise be nutrient deficient. With respect to pain management, medical marijuana reduces both pain perception and the dosage requirements of opioids, regardless of if the pain was caused by nerve damage, inflammation, or other tissue damage. Lastly, placebo-controlled studies show that patients using medical marijuana report improved sleep quality, less acute anxiety, and a better mood overall throughout their treatment process.

 

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Chronic Abdominal Pain

(irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease)

 

The chronic abdominal pain found in Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Crohn’s Disease, and Ulcerative Colitis stems from the body’s immune system incorrectly recognizing parts of the digestive system as foreign, and attacking the tissue as if it were an infection. The apparent reduction in most of the symptoms of these diseases when the appropriate medical marijuana is used is an intense area of research. CB1 and CB2 receptors are found in different places throughout the digestive system, but the well-known anti-inflammatory role of the CB2 receptor is believed to play the major role in medical marijuana’s effectiveness here. A recent observational study strongly suggests that cannabis use reduced the intensity of symptoms, the dosages of additional medications, and the need for corrective surgery in the vast majority of subjects. Another study even shows nearly half of patients entering remission, and the rest improving their quality of life with no significant side effects.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Chronic Back Pain

 

Chronic back pain affects millions of Americans, and the statistics show that our aging and increasingly sedentary population will lead to more Americans suffering from this condition in the near future. Whether it be due to poor posture, some past trauma, or a degenerative disease affecting the spine, the main concerns of patients lie in the pain itself, and worries over the side effects of opioid pain killers. The general pain-relief benefits of medical marijuana are anecdotally known, supported by many studies, and are discussed elsewhere on this page. Specific to the relief of back pain, a study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found that medical marijuana offers significant pain reduction to patients afflicted with neuropathic pain, a common source of back pain; additionally, even when the cannabis was not the sole medication being taken for pain relief, its use reduced the dosage and frequency of the prescribed opioid. This isn’t all: animal studies clearly show that the CBD in cannabis directly protects the soft disks of the spine from further damage.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Chronic Pain

 

Research shows marijuana is a safe and effective way to ease chronic pain from various medical conditions. Studies in chronic pain of both neuropathic and inflammatory origin have found marijuana to be effective treatment. Cannabinoids are involved in the release of endogenous opioids which moderate pain. The pain mediation responses of marijuana are related to the location of CB1 receptors in central nervous system and peripheral nerves. CB2 receptors are active in both acute and chronic pain, especially that of inflammatory origin. While some studies have suggested that cannabis is no more effective than codeine in controlling pain, the side effect profile of marijuana versus narcotic pain relievers shows that marijuana is a safer option to control chronic pain.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

Depression

 

Clinically diagnosed depression goes well beyond the occasional mood swing experienced by everyone; the lack of appetite, lack of interest in daily activities, feelings of worthlessness, poor sleep quality, and other symptoms massively reduce the patient’s quality of life. Anecdotal evidence has shown for hundreds of years that cannabis can be used to combat the symptoms of depressive disorders. More recent studies show a mixture of results, but almost of all of these examined recreational marijuana use with respect to depression. In a University of Colorado study, researchers found that under more controlled conditions and with consideration of personality factors, marijuana use negatively predicted depressions symptoms. Additional research has led the scientific community to believe that depression is caused by de-regulation of serotonin in the brain, an important neurotransmitter. All of the serotonin regulators typically prescribed for depression have major side effects and a significant risk of withdrawal symptoms – a risk almost never found with prescription cannabis. Medical marijuana similarly regulates the production of serotonin, and research suggests that it works best at low dosages. The possibility of reducing the symptoms of depression with doses too low to have induce the euphoric sensation of being “high” makes medical marijuana a strong candidate to treat this disorder.

Medical Marijuana &

 

Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders

 

Seizure disorders of all kinds come from the misfiring of neurons in the brain, and can manifest in numerous ways, from periodic blackouts all the way up to full body convulsions. Epilepsy, the most common of the seizure disorders, has long been thought of as a condition potentially treatable by medical cannabis. This is because the endocannabinoid system is chiefly responsible for feedback regulation at the point where one neuron communicates with another, making it a critical part of normal signal transmission in the brain. Growing evidence suggests that the major non-psychoactive component of medical marijuana, CBD, promotes the activity of the endocannabinoid system, which in turn reduces the excitability of neurons in the brain. Among patients with seizure disorders that were not responsive to currently available treatments, pure CBD reduced seizure activity to a much greater extent than those taking a placebo.

 

Medical Marijuana &

Glaucoma

(end stage)

 

Glaucoma, one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness, affects upwards of three million Americans. It is characterized by degeneration of the optic nerve that conducts visual information from the eye to the brain, and is now understood to be a neurodegenerative condition similar to Alzheimer’s disease. A key factor in the progression of the disease is the pressure of the fluid within the eyeball itself, or intraocular pressure (IOP); a proven way to prevent further blindness is to find a way to reduce the IOP. Since the 1970s, research conclusively showed that medical marijuana reduced the pressure within the eye, most likely through the action of cannabinoid receptors along the tissue lining the interior of the eye. When taken orally or applied topically, CBD and other components of medical marijuana show promise as additional treatment options for glaucoma, especially in the disease’s later stages.

 

Medical Marijuana &

Insomnia

 

Insomnia means having a hard time getting to sleep, staying asleep, or both. Many patients report that when compared to conventional sleep medications, marijuana works better, is not habit-forming, and leaves them having less side effects the next day. Although most adults have experienced these types of symptoms at one time or another, an estimated 30%–50% of the general population has some degree of insomnia, and 10% have chronic insomnia. Research shows that the cannabinoid CBD helps with sleep better than THC. When using marijuana for insomnia, it is important to keep in mind which strain to use. Most patients find that Indica strains are more relaxing with a pronounced sedative quality. Inhaled cannabis – preferably smoke-free vapor – generally provides an immediate effect and lasts for about 3–4 hours. Edible or ingested cannabis, on the other hand, takes up to an hour to have an effect, but lasts for up to 6–8 hours. Therefore, an edible marijuana product, taken about an hour before bedtime, can work very well to help get a full night sleep.

 

Medical Marijuana &

Migraines

 

A growing body of research is clearly showing that medical marijuana is a potent treatment for migraines, cluster headaches, and similar conditions. While the underlying causes of these types of headaches is an area of active investigation, there is some consensus that the pain-modulating role of the endocannabinoid system plays a part in medical marijuana’s effect. Additionally, studies of animal models suggest that CB2 receptors outside of the central nervous system play a specific role in the perception of pain. A study in Pharmacotherapy clearly shows that there is a significant reduction in the frequency and severity of headaches, inhaled medical cannabis can abort an ongoing headache in many people, and far fewer side effects are observed by inhaled prescription cannabis compared to edible cannabis products. Still another study shows that THC and CBD together can be more effective in treating migraine headaches, than even currently available treatments.

 

Medical Marijuana &

Nausea

 

Medical cannabis is a trusted alternative medication for fighting nausea and vomiting. Growing evidence draws this out, and that this is because the endocannabinoid system regulates the feeling of nausea in humans. The National Cancer Institute lists medical marijuana as an effective and well-tolerated medication for those undergoing chemotherapy, when it comes to eliminating the sensation of nausea and the vomiting that goes with it. A 2008 review published in the European Journal of Cancer Care analyzed 30 clinical studies using cannabinoid drugs synthesized in the lab (such as Marinol) and concluded that they were better than standard anti-nausea drugs in alleviating the nausea and vomiting that accompanies chemotherapy. The same is also true when all other anti-nausea medications have been tried unsuccessfully. This extends over to nausea from any underlying cause, so that those suffering from chronic nausea can and have used medical marijuana with very positive results on their quality of life.

 

Medical Marijuana &

Neuropathic Pain

 

Neuropathic pain often feels like a tingling, burning, stabbing pain. Neuropathic pain can be difficult to diagnose and tricky to treat. It’s most often a symptom of an underlying problem like diabetes, alcoholism or autoimmune disease. Neuropathy can also be caused by vitamin-B deficiency, tumors, infections, cancer treatments and certain hereditary disorders. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, reported in The Journal of Pain that patients with neuropathy who used marijuana were more likely to have significant relief than those taking a placebo. The cannabinoids in marijuana affect cell receptors in the brain, reducing pain and making it an alternative for patients who are unresponsive to standard drug therapies. Patients often turn to marijuana as a pain reliever that doesn’t possess the harmful side effects of other prescription neuropathy medications which can be addictive.

 

Medical Marijuana &

Persistent Muscle Spasms

(spasticity)

 

Muscle spasms can develop in any of the muscles of the body, and have causes that range from local electrolyte imbalances and dehydration, to the nerve damage of debilitating diseases. Cannabinoid receptors outside of the central nervous system provide feedback between nerve cells, and manipulating this process allows medical marijuana to massively reduce the amount of severity of spasms. One of the best-documented uses for prescription cannabis has been to treat the spasms and other uncontrolled movements of Multiple Sclerosis, and more recent investigations suggest that medical marijuana is equally effective for patients with spinal cord injuries. Other medications used to reduce muscle spasticity, like barbiturates and similar medicines, have major side effects that many patients find intolerable. Medical marijuana lacks any of these, and the ratio of THC to CBD can be adjusted to reduce the side effects that are present.

 

Medical Marijuana &

PTSD

 

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a terrifying event in which grave physical or emotional harm occurred or was threatened. Traumatic events that may trigger PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat. Individuals with PTSD may have persistent frightening thoughts and memories, experience sleep problems, feel detached or numb, or be easily distracted. Researchers found that people with PTSD had lower levels of anandamide, an endogenous (naturally occurring) cannabinoid compound, compared to those who did not show signs of PTSD. Endogenous anandamide triggers the same receptors that are activated by THC and other components of the marijuana, therefore providing an effective and safe treatment for PTSD.

Phone: 305-433-1767

 

 

  •     Anxiety
  •     ALS (Lou Gehrig's)
  •     Anorexia
  •     Arthritis
  •     Back Pain
  •     Cachexia (Wasting Syndrome)
  •     Cancer
  •     Chron's Disease
  •     Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome
  •     Diabetes

 

 

 

 

 

  •     Epilepsy
  •     Glaucoma
  •     Hepatitis C
  •     HIV
  •     Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  •     Lyme Disease
  •     Migraines
  •     Multiple Sclerosis
  •     Muscle Spasms
  •     Muscular Dystrophy

 

 

 

 

 

  •     Parkinson's Disease
  •     Post Traumatic Stress (PTSD)
  •     Seizures
  •     Severe & Chronic Pain
  •     Severe Nausea
  •     Sickle Cell Anemia
  •     Spasticity
  •     Any Terminal Condition
  •    Other Debilitating Condition of Like Kind, Or Class

 

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

ADHD

 

ADHD is a condition which encompasses a wide range of symptoms including inattention, hyperactivity and impulsiveness. Research on the use of medical marijuana for the treatment of ADHD is limited however a number of preclinical studies have provided evidence of marijuana’s potential as a treatment for this disorder. The strongest evidence comes from research which shows that the endocannabinoid system can influence dopamine levels in the brain which may be altered in patients with ADHD. A study published in 2009 found that anandamide levels (one of the cannabinoids that are naturally found in humans) were higher in patients with ADHD. This seems to indicate that the human body may naturally produce more endocannabinoids in an attempt to counter the symptoms of ADHD, leading researchers to believe that the endocannabinoid system could be effective in the treatment of this disorder. Furthermore, studies show that cannabinoid receptors are found in higher density in areas of the brain that are linked to ADHD, specifically the amygdala and hippocampus regions.

 

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

ANOREXIA

 

It’s no secret that marijuana helps to increase appetite, but its potential to treat anorexia is not that simple. Research suggests anorexia leads to changes in the brain, specifically pathways which are part of the endocannabinoid system. A recent study in Belgium concluded that change in the brain’s cannabinoid system likely takes place as an effect, rather than a cause of anorexia. Specifically, their findings suggest that the body creates more receptors to compensate for a “chronically hypoactive” endocannabinoid system in cases of anorexia. But these changes may only be temporary, since receptors rebounded to normal levels after the experiments stopped. The endocannabinoid system acts as a regulator of appetite. Some scientists believe that the body may produce lower levels of cannabiniods in order to improve the ability to survive during prolonged starvation or anorexic states. Therefore, patients with anorexia may experience a natural decrease in appetite because of changes that occur in the brain.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

ANXIETY

 

Scientists now understand that a cannabinoid molecule known as cannabidiol, or CBD, is responsible for many of the anxiety-relieving effects of marijuana. CBD, like the more well-known cannabinoid THC, is one of over 100 such molecules found in the marijuana plant. CBD has been shown to act on natural receptors that are found in our nervous system known as CB1 receptors. Marijuana can reduce anxiety because of its effect on the cannabinoid receptors compensating for the reduction in the production of natural endocannabinoids, specifically in the amygdala which is the part of the brain that is involved in regulating anxiety and the fight-or-flight response. A study led by Dr Sachin Patel and published in The Journal Neuron, showed for the first time how nerve cells in this part of the brain make and release their own natural ‘endocannabinoids’. The natural endocannabinoid system regulates anxiety and the response to stress by dampening signals in the brain.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

ARTHRITIS

 

Marijuana contains powerful anti-inflammatory compounds as well as natural analgesics making it a very beneficial treatment for arthritis. In 2000, researchers found that cannabidiol “effectively blocked progression of arthritis” in animal trials. In a 2005 study, THC and cannabidiol were found to produce improvements in pain and reduce disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A study published in 2008 was able to show for the first time that cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 are present in the knee joints of patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The study identified the presence of two endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the synovial fluid of arthritis patients, but not in samples taken from healthy volunteers. Endocannabinoids are known to be synthesized and released by the body in response to inflammatory conditions, suggesting that activity of the endocannabinoid system may be one of the body’s natural mechanisms for fighting arthritis.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

ASTHMA

 

Patients with asthma take extra caution when it comes to smoking anything, since asthma is a potentially life-threatening disorder that can severely disrupt one’s breathing. While it may seem logical for asthmatics to avoid marijuana, research seems to support the opposite – that is, marijuana could be an effective treatment for asthma. Research has shown marijuana to be effective at reversing the bronchoconstriction in patients with asthma. Studies have identified CB1 receptors on nerve cells of the airway, suggesting a role of cannabinoid receptors in the contraction of airway muscles. Naturally occurring cannabinoids which mimic the effects of THC, such as anandamide, may also be able to control the contraction of airway muscles by activating CB1 receptors. THC provides the same therapeutic benefits as natural cannabinoids, but with a stronger and longer-lasting effect. THC has shown to elicit similar effects on the airway regardless of the route of administration.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

CANCER

 

There are few things in life more frightening than receiving a cancer diagnosis. The benefits of marijuana for cancer patients are clear when it comes to increased appetite, reduction of pain, wasting, vomiting and nausea, and depression. Although its anticarcinogenic effects are not quite as clear, ongoing research further points to the possibility that marijuana may have anti-tumor properties. Research in mice and rats have shown that cannabinoids may inhibit tumor growth by causing cell death, blocking cell growth, and blocking the development of blood vessels needed by tumors to grow. Laboratory and animal studies have shown that cannabinoids may be able to kill cancer cells while protecting normal cells. When given along with chemotherapy, cannabidiol may make chemotherapy more effective and increase cancer cell death without harming normal cells.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN

 

The effectiveness of marijuana for treating symptoms related to gastrointestinal disorders is widely recognized and researched. The most common gastrointestinal disorders are Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis) which effect millions of people. The disorders are different, but each causes a great deal of discomfort and distress and both can be disabling. Painful cramping, chronic diarrhea or constipation, nausea, and inflammation of the intestines are all symptoms of these GI disorders that can be alleviated by marijuana. Research suggests that marijuana is effective in treating the symptoms of these GI disorders in part because it interacts with the endogenous cannabinoid receptors in the digestive tract, which can result in calming spasms, reducing pain, and improving motility. Marijuana has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties which may aid in the pain relief of chronic abdominal pain.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

CHRONIC BACK PAIN

 

Low back pain affects approximately one in every four U.S. adults, and its incidence increases with age. This is likely due to the aging process and a more sedentary lifestyle. Additionally, many patients with back pain have experienced some sort of trauma, such as a motor vehicle accident or sports injury. More and more, medical cannabis is becoming the treatment of choice for many patients who suffer from chronic back pain. In fact, due to its broad range of therapeutic actions, many back pain patients are able to eliminate some, or even all, of their prescription medications through the use of medical cannabis.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

CHRONIC PAIN

 

Research shows marijuana is a safe and effective way to ease chronic pain from various medical conditions. Studies in chronic pain of both neuropathic and inflammatory origin have found marijuana to be effective treatment. Cannabinoids are involved in the release of endogenous opioids which moderate pain. The pain mediation responses of marijuana are related to the location of CB1 receptors in central nervous system and peripheral nerves. CB2 receptors are active in both acute and chronic pain, especially that of inflammatory origin. While some studies have suggested that cannabis is no more effective than codeine in controlling pain, the side effect profile of marijuana versus narcotic pain relievers shows that marijuana is a safer option to control chronic pain.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

DEPRESSION

 

Depression is a medical illness that can lead to a variety of emotional as well as physical problems. It is a chronic condition that often requires long-term treatment. Depression may be treated in a variety of ways, most commonly with psychological counseling and prescription drugs. Unfortunately, antidepressant medications are associated with a wide variety of very serious side effects that make them unacceptable to many patients. These side effects range from blurred vision and constipation to fatigue and impaired thinking to headaches and sexual problems to liver failure and suicide. As a result of their frustration with these pharmaceutical drug side effects, many patients seek out a safer, more natural alternative, such as medical marijuana.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

EPILEPSY/SEIZURES

 

Epilepsy is a persistent condition of the brain. It involves unpredictable abnormal electrical discharges or misfiring of brain cells (neurons). This misfiring in the brain can cause episodes of bodily convulsions, loss of coordination, loss of consciousness or altered sensory states. These episodes are commonly called seizures. People with epilepsy have persistent and recurring seizures. One may be born with epilepsy, or may acquire it because of disease or injury. Marijuana has anti-convulsant properties mainly due to Cannabidiol (CBD), a compound found at higher levels in some strains of marijuana (most notable is the Charlotte’s Web strain), make cannabis an excellent candidate for controlling the spasms associated with Epilepsy. Evidence is continuing to grow that marijuana may indeed be a better anti-convulsant than standard prescription medications.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

GLAUCOMA

 

Marijuana has had a long history in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma. Glaucoma is a condition in which increased pressure in the eyeball, damages the optic nerve and can lead to blindness. The pressure lowering effects of marijuana have been thought to be through the action of the central nervous system. More current research has shows that there are cannabinoid receptors within the eye which suggests that the endocannabinoid system may have dictation over the aqueous humour outflow and production. Other research findings have shown that the vaso-dilatory effects of marijuana in the eye are helpful for aqueous humoural outflow. Marijuana significantly reduces the pressure inside the eye and may slow the progression of the disease, preventing loss of vision.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

INSOMNIA

 

Insomnia means having a hard time getting to sleep, staying asleep, or both. Many patients report that when compared to conventional sleep medications, marijuana works better, is not habit-forming, and leaves them having less side effects the next day. Although most adults have experienced these types of symptoms at one time or another, an estimated 30%–50% of the general population has some degree of insomnia, and 10% have chronic insomnia. Research shows that the cannabinoid CBD helps with sleep better than THC. When using marijuana for insomnia, it is important to keep in mind which strain to use. Most patients find that Indica strains are more relaxing with a pronounced sedative quality. Inhaled cannabis – preferably smoke-free vapor – generally provides an immediate effect and lasts for about 3–4 hours. Edible or ingested cannabis, on the other hand, takes up to an hour to have an effect, but lasts for up to 6–8 hours. Therefore, an edible marijuana product, taken about an hour before bedtime, can work very well to help get a full night sleep.

 

Medical Marijuana &

 

MIGRAINES

 

Migraines are a severe form of headache that are estimated to affect 15% of the worldwide population. Patients describe the attacks as throbbing sensations in a specific area of the head, usually accompanied by nausea, vomiting and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. The effect of marijuana on cannabinoid receptors has been shown to have a positive impact on a wide range of factors involved with migraine headaches such as inflammation, pain, and nausea. It also affects blood vessels by reducing muscle cramps that can accompany migraines; and it lessens anxiety which can worsen the symptoms of migraines. Experts have also suggested that a lack of endocannabinoids may contribute to the development and severity of migraine attacks. Many patients report that the other benefits of marijuana, like improved sleep and less anxiety, reduce the frequency of their migraines.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

NAUSEA

 

It has been proven by various research time and time again, that marijuana is a highly effective in the treatment of nausea and vomiting regardless of the cause. Nausea and vomiting may prove to be more harmful to the body in prolonged cases. It may cause severe dehydration as well as loss of appetite thus leading to malnutrition. THC binds to endocannabinoid receptors in the brain to provide relief from nausea, smoking (preferably vapor) marijuana provides superior treatment for vomiting when compared to THC ingested orally. Even though there are around 10 standard antiemetic drugs for nausea and vomiting, it has been found that nine of them are ineffective in a specific situation or result in intolerable side effects. A 2008 review published in the European Journal of Cancer Care analyzed 30 clinical studies using cannabinoid drugs synthesized in the lab (such as Marinol) and concluded that they were better than standard anti-nausea drugs in alleviating the nausea and vomiting that accompanies chemotherapy. Despite all the above-mentioned drugs that are available, marijuana is still the best medication as it provides fast and safe relief.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

NEUROPATHIC PAIN

 

Neuropathic pain often feels like a tingling, burning, stabbing pain. Neuropathic pain can be difficult to diagnose and tricky to treat. It’s most often a symptom of an underlying problem like diabetes, alcoholism or autoimmune disease. Neuropathy can also be caused by vitamin-B deficiency, tumors, infections, cancer treatments and certain hereditary disorders. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, reported in The Journal of Pain that patients with neuropathy who used marijuana were more likely to have significant relief than those taking a placebo. The cannabinoids in marijuana affect cell receptors in the brain, reducing pain and making it an alternative for patients who are unresponsive to standard drug therapies. Patients often turn to marijuana as a pain reliever that doesn’t possess the harmful side effects of other prescription neuropathy medications which can be addictive.

 

 

Medical Marijuana &

PERSISTENT MUSCLE SPASMS

 

Spasms may affect many different types of muscles in the body, leading to many different symptoms and presentations. THC has each been found to relieve a broad range of muscle spasms in a number of human and animal studies. A 1990 double-blind trial comparing THC with codeine demonstrated that while they both displayed an analgesic effect in comparison with a placebo, “only delta-9 THC showed a significant beneficial effect on spasticity” meaning that medical marijuana has positive benefits for muscle spasms. Unlike marijuana, powerful barbiturates and muscle relaxers currently in use for treatment of severe muscle spasms are known to have serious and life-threatening side effects. Medical marijuana patients suffering from severe spastic conditions have reported that marijuana significantly improves their quality of life.

Medical Marijuana & PTSD

 

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a terrifying event in which grave physical or emotional harm occurred or was threatened. Traumatic events that may trigger PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat. Individuals with PTSD may have persistent frightening thoughts and memories, experience sleep problems, feel detached or numb, or be easily distracted. Researchers found that people with PTSD had lower levels of anandamide, an endogenous (naturally occurring) cannabinoid compound, compared to those who did not show signs of PTSD. Endogenous anandamide triggers the same receptors that are activated by THC and other components of the marijuana, therefore providing an effective and safe treatment for PTSD.